CLOSE

Follow us on social media:

Proudly Presented By The Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction
May 11 & 12, 2023
8:45AM – 3:45PM
Washington State Clock Hours Will Be Provided

In this Synchronous literacy summit (via Zoom) you will learn about the Science of Reading (SoR) from literacy leaders covering topics that include: multilingual learners, highly capable learners, multiage learners, and ELA and cross curricular learning.

Click Here to View Summit Flyer
.PDF
Click Here to Register For Summit
$200 USD

Summit Handouts

Coming May 2023

Meet Our Exceptional Speakers

Louisa Moats Ed.D.

Author, Literacy Expert, Consultant

Dr. Louisa Moats, Ed.D. is a nationally recognized authority on how children learn to read and why some fail to learn. Widely acclaimed as a literacy scientist.

• Developed the landmark professional development program LETRS for teachers
• Author of LANGUAGE! Live, a blended instructional program for middle and high school students
• Co-author of Spellography, a structured language word study program for intermediate poor spellers

Dr. Elsa Cárdenas-Hagan

Bridges to Literacy for English Learners

Dr. Cárdenas-Hagan is the President of Valley Speech Language and Learning Center in Brownsville, Texas, and is an Associate Research Professor for the Texas Institute for Measurement Evaluation and Statistics at the University of Houston.

• Research interests include the development of early reading assessments for Spanish-speaking students and…
• The development of reading interventions for bilingual students
• Co-principal investigator examining the oracy and literacy development in English and Spanish of Spanish-speaking children

Dr. Tracy White-Weeden

President/CEO of the Neuhas Education Centre

Dr. White-Weeden has served as President and CEO of Neuhaus Education Center – named one of the top 50 women leaders in Houston Texas.

• Trains and coaches teachers to implement the Science of Reading
• Offers resources to families and adult learners with dyslexia
• For more than 40 years, Neuhaus Education Center (NEC) has been a trailblazer in solutions for overcoming obstacles toliteracy

Dr. Linnea Ehri

Dr. Ehri is one of the most influential and cited reading scientistists with 160 published papers in the past 40 years.

Dr. Linnea Ehri is a Distinguished Professor Emerita at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York where she was a member of the faculty in Educational Psychology and in Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences. Since the 1970s she has been conducting scientific research on how children learn to read.

Dr. Ehri will describe the four ways children learn to read unfamiliar words:
• One way is by decoding, also called phonological recoding
• Another way is by analogizing. This involves using words we already know to read new words
• Another way is by prediction using context and letter clues to guess unfamiliar words
• The fourth way of reading words is by memory or sight as applied to words we have read before

Dr. Julie Washington

Author of: Dyslexia: Revisiting Etiology, Diagnosis, Treatment, and Policy

Julie is a speech pathologist and a Professor in the School of Education at the University of California – Irvine (UCI).

The Impact of Language Differences on Reading Development
• The intersection of poverty, literacy, and dialectic differences
• The impact on language-based academic areas – reading, spelling, writing and math
• The impact on language, reading and assessment outcomes

Dr. Sonia Cabell

Author of: Emergent Literacy Lessons For Success

Sonia Q. Cabell is an associate professor in the School of Teacher Education and the Florida Center for Reading Research at Florida State University.

Early Years Environment (Birth – Age 8) Especially Critical
• Focuses on the prevention of reading difficulties among young children who are at-risk, particularly those who are living in poverty
• Features how to strengthen children’s language and literacy skills that serve as precursors to both successful reading, spelling, writing and math
• Emphasizing innovative ways to accelerate language and literacy learning

Dr. Hugh Catts

Author of: Sounds Abound: Listening, Rhyming, and Reading

Hugh is a professor at the Florida Center for Reading Research focusing his work outcomes for struggling adolescent readers as well as early learners who struggle.

Language/Literacy and Reading Disorders
• The early identification and prevention of language-based reading disabilities
• Currently involved in three longitudinal investigations related to early identification
• The impact on language, reading and assessment outcomes

Dr. Louise Spear-Swerling

Author of: Structured Literacy Interventions K to 6

Dr. Louise Spear-Swerling is Professor Emerita in the Department of Special Education at the Southern Connecticut State University in New Haven CT.

• Research interests focus on children’s reading development and literacy difficulties, as well as teacher knowledge for reading instruction
• Prepared both general and special education teacher candidates to teach reading using structured literacy approaches for many years
• Consults often for K–12 schools, primarily on cases involving students with severe or persistent literacy difficulties

Dr. Chase Young

Author of: Artfully Teaching the Science of Reading (2022)

Dr. Young is a professor at Sam Houston State UniversityIn the School of Teaching and Learning.

• How artful teaching is integrated into reading instruction
• How it can increase students’ motivation
• How teachers can use the science of reading to engage students in artful, engaging, and authentic instruction

Dr. Emily Solari

Emily Solari is the coordinator and professor in the Reading Education program in the Department of Curriculum Instruction and Special Education at the University of Virginia.

Leveraging Scientific Evidence to Improve Classroom Practice
• Studies the prevalence, predictors, and underlying mechanisms that drive reading development
• Recent Brick by Brick articles summarize scientific evidence about the importance of English language learners and early interventions
• Studies Intervention development and trials with students who have early profiles of reading difficulties

Dr. Anne Cunningham

Author of: Book Smart: How to Develop and Support Successful, Motivated Readers

Dr. Anne Cunningham is the Director of the Joint Doctoral Program in Special Education with the Graduate School of Education at Berkeley and the Historian of the Society for the Scientific Study of Reading.  She is the co-author of "What Reading Does For The Mind" and numerous other articles and research papers related to reading.

Phonics and Phonological Awareness
• The two most impactful early reading skills in detail
• Classroom strategies that develop successful, motivated readers
• Raising literate, book-happy kids

Dr. Margie Gillis

President and Founder of Literacy How, Inc.

In 2009, Margie founded Literacy How, Inc. to provide professional development opportunities and coaching for teachers on how best to implement evidence-based reading practices in the classroom.

• Explores promising evidence-based literacy practices with the potential for scaling up
• Co-Author: First grade teachers’ knowledge of phonological awareness and code concepts
• "The science of reading should be the guiding force behind what schools do to effectively teach children."

DeJunne’ Clark Jackson

The Center for Literacy and Learning’s President of Program Development

DeJunne' Clark Jackson, M.A., M.A.T., M.Ed., CALT, LDT, serves as President of The Center for Literacy & Learning. She is also President of The Reading League Louisiana, the state leader of Decoding Dyslexia Louisiana, and the founder of Learning Fundamentals Educational Therapy & Consulting. DeJunne’ has the honor of serving on the Louisiana Department of Education’s Early Literacy Commission and Special Education Advisory Panel. She is the co-author of The Speech Language Pathologist’s Guide to Dyslexia.

DeJunne’ Clark Jackson, among other achievements, is a Certified Academic Language Therapist and nationally credentialed AET Educational Therapist. As a former classroom teacher and school counselor, DeJunne’ has had the opportunity to work with a myriad of students with general and specific needs. She is most impassioned about the advocacy she’s curated surrounding dyslexia awareness, early identification, and remediation. She will discuss her successful experiences and stories of:
• The importance of collaborative and inclusive cultures
• Advocacy for children and families
• The work of The Center for Literacy & Learning

Dr. Joan Sedita

Author of: The Writing Rope

Dr. Sedita has authored a number of books including: Writing: the Road to Reading Comprehension Module 11 of the LETRS reading training series (2004). In 2022, her book The Writing Rope: A Framework for Explicit Writing Instruction in All Subjects was published (Brookes Publishing). She is the author of the Keys to Literacy professional development books, including The Key Comprehension Routine, The Key Vocabulary Routine, Keys to Content Writing, Keys to Early Writing, and Keys to Beginning Reading.

Dr. Sedita will describe highlights of her Writing Rope Framework:
• Writing approached as a task as complex and multifaceted as reading
•How to plan and deliver comprehensive, explicit, and evidence-based writing instruction with this ground-breaking book
• How her Writing Rope Framework is aligned with IDA's Structured Literacy approach and is also based on the latest research

Summit Program

Thursday, May 11, 2023
8:15AM – 3:45PM
* Pacific Time Zone (PT)
8:15 – 8:45
Waiting Room Opens
8:45 — 9:00
Opening Comments
9:00 – 10:30
Dr. Tracy White-Weeden
How to Implement Systems Change for Sustainable Literacy Transformation – A Blueprint for Success (Grade Level: All)
Sustainable literacy transformation is made possible when systems are prepped for change by doing the right work. Learn to prepare your system for measurable growth in student achievement, teacher knowledge, and leadership capacity through the application of the science of reading. This presentation will also position you to ensure your vision includes a strategy to address the upstream issue of teacher and leader preparation programs.
10:30 – 10:45
Nutrition Break
10:45 – 12:00
Dr. Louise Spear-Swerling
Beyond Phonology: Using Structured Literacy Interventions to Address a Variety of Common Reading Problems (Grade Level: All)
Structured Literacy interventions are best known for their effectiveness with students who have dyslexia or other reading problems based in phonological skills. However, Structured Literacy can also benefit students whose reading problems are based entirely or partially in comprehension. This presentation begins by describing common profiles of reading difficulties that teachers encounter in the elementary and middle school grades. It then reviews the features of Structured Literacy, how these features differ from typical practices in reading instruction, and why Structured Literacy can be effective with different profiles of reading difficulties. Multiple examples of Structured Literacy activities for helping struggling readers in the K-8 grade range, including those with problems based in vocabulary, syntax, or text comprehension, as well as decoding, are provided. The presentation concludes by considering some challenges involved in implementing Structured Literacy and possible ways to address them.
12:00 – 12:45
Lunch
12:45 – 2:00
Breakout Rooms (3)
1
Dr. Hugh Catts
Reconceptualizing Assessment and Intervention for Reading Comprehension (Grade Level: All)
The poor performance of American students on state and national tests of reading comprehension is a well-recognized educational challenge and one that is difficult to address. Poor comprehension represents a multifactorial problem that is impacted by numerous reader, text, and task factors. Among the reader factors, the role of background knowledge and deep thinking have been particularly absent in conceptualizations of comprehension problems. Also, the specifics of what is read and for what purpose is typically given little consideration. To address these issues, a multidimensional model of reading comprehension is reintroduced and its implications for the identification, assessment, and intervention of comprehension problems will be discussed.
2
Dr. Emily Solari
The Evidence Base for Early Literacy Development for Monolingual and Spanish-speaking English Learners. (Grade Level: Primary)
This presentation will address the evidence base for early literacy development for both monolingual and Spanish-speaking English learners. The broad evidence base for explicit and systematic instruction will be highlighted, and individual studies as meta-analytic findings will be covered. Her presentation will reference her work with intervention development and trials with students who have early profiles of reading difficulties, individuals diagnosed with autism, and English language learners. Her work has included intervention development and trials with students who have early profiles of reading difficulties, individuals diagnosed with autism, and English language learners.
3
De Junne’ Clark Jackson M.Ed.
Creating a Culture of Collaboration: The Mission IS Possible! (Grade Level: All)
The mission is simple. Equip students with the literacy skills necessary to be successful learners through the use of evidence-based reading instructional practices. Empower parents and families with the knowledge essential to become well-informed participants in the decision-making process. To provide educators with the appropriate tools and information critical to effectively teach and reach students. Hearing and assembling the experiences of each of these stakeholders is critical to building a collaborative and inclusive education culture. Each stakeholder plays a vital role in the discovery, identification, and intervention stages of literacy development. When a student struggles, the collective can come together to find solutions, working toward the common and agreed-upon goal – student success!
2:00 – 3:30
Dr. Julie Washington
Teaching Reading to African American Children: Incorporating Variation (Grade Level: All)
Teaching any child to read requires attention to language use and development. For children who speak varieties of English, in this case, African American children, it is important to recognize, affirm and include the language variety that they bring to reading instruction. Extending the language expertise that African American children bring to school with them to include the language of print is critical for developing strong readers. This has not been our approach to date. This presentation will examine the potential role of translanguaging approaches for improving the reading outcomes of African American children who use African American English.
3:30 – 3:45
Closing Comments

Summit Program

Friday, May 12a, 2023
8:15AM – 3:45PM
* Pacific Time Zone (PT)
8:15 – 8:45
Waiting Room Opens
8:45 — 9:00
Opening Comments
9:00 – 10:30
Dr. Louisa Moats
Explicit Language Instruction is the Heart of Structured Literacy (Grade Level: All)
Reading comprehension is the product of word recognition and language comprehension. Each part of Hoover and Gough and Tunmer's "simple view" equation can be taught explicitly and systematically: phoneme awareness, phonic decoding, spelling, word recognition fluency, vocabulary, and text reading for meaning. We will contrast Structured Literacy components and teaching techniques with popular approaches that are not aligned with reading science, with the goal of ensuring that all students, especially those "at risk," can beat the odds and become readers
10:30 – 10:45
Nutrition Break
10:45 – 12:00
Breakout Rooms (3)
1
Dr. Sonia Cabell
Content-Rich Literacy Instruction in the Primary Grades (Grade Level: Primary)
This presentation examines what research says about integrating content-area instruction into English Language Arts (ELA) to improve students’ oral language and content knowledge in the primary grades. From a careful synthesis of the existing literature of efficacious content-rich literacy approaches, several recommended practices emerge. These practices include: planning ELA units around science and/or studies topics, using conceptually coherent text sets ordered to build content knowledge, engaging in discussion and writing focused on building knowledge, and teaching relationships among words. Special attention will be paid to the role of responsive classroom conversations in promoting language learning.
2
Joan Sedita M.Ed.
The Writing Rope: A Framework for Explicit Writing in All Subjects (Grade Level: 3 - 12)
This workshop includes an overview of The Writing Rope model for writing instruction (Sedita, 2019). Many teachers do not recognize that effective writing instruction must address multiple components, represented as strands in a rope in this model. An explanation with references to research findings will be provided for the five strands: 1) Critical Thinking (generating ideas and information, stages of the writing process), 2) Syntax (syntactic awareness, sentence elaboration, punctuation), 3) Text Structure (narrative, informational, opinion; paragraph structure; patterns of organization, 4) Writing Craft (awareness of task, audience, purpose; word choice; literary devices), 5) Transcription (spelling and handwriting fluency). This workshop addresses writing instruction across grades 3-12.
3
Dr. Margie Gillis
How and Why to Bring the Science of Reading and Structured Literacy into Every Classroom: A Call to Action (Grade Level: PK - 5)
Why is the opportunity gap so persistent and how can we accelerate students’ reading and writing achievement to close it? Schools and districts are supporting their teachers as they learn how to apply the science of reading by using a structured literacy approach in all tiers of instruction. This session will describe a systematic and engaging approach that integrates the elements of language into literacy instruction throughout the day. Designed for all teachers who are charged with teaching essential literacy skills, participants will learn about critical pedagogical principles, the core components of comprehensive literacy, and a few key instructional strategies to explicitly teach phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, morphology, syntax, and comprehension.
12:00 – 12:45
Lunch
12:45 – 2:00
Breakout Rooms (3)
1
Chase Young
Artfully Teaching the Science of Fluency: Newly Published! (Grade Level: All)
The foundation for this session is based our book, Artfully Teaching the Science of Reading by Chase Young, David Paige, and Tim Rasinski. We explore the empirical research and prominent theories in reading fluency and use them as a foundation for understanding reading fluency instruction and interventions. We learn about whole group, small group, and one-on-one approaches that can develop fluent readers effectively and efficiently. We also work together to develop new, creative, and effective approaches to teaching reading fluency. In the book, we encourage teachers to use their scientific knowledge in reading and generate engaging instruction that not only touches the mind, but also their hearts.
2
Dr. Linnea Ehri
How Beginners Learn to Read and Spell Words: Phases of Development and Orthographic Mapping (Grade Level: All)
Unfamiliar words may be read by decoding, analogizing, or predicting from context. Words read before are read from memory automatically “by sight.” Sight words are stored in memory when connections are formed between graphemes in spellings and phonemes in pronunciations of words, called orthographic mapping. Children need phonemic segmentation, knowledge of grapheme-phoneme (GP) relations, and decoding skill to retain graphemes in the spellings of words connected to phonemes in their pronunciations in memory. Four phases portray the course of development in forming GP connections to retain sight words in memory for reading and spelling, from pre- alphabetic (no GP connections used), to partial alphabetic (partial connections such as initial and final GPs in words), to full alphabetic (complete GP connections formed), to consolidated alphabetic (GPs consolidated to form larger syllabic units used to form connections). Scientifically designed studies will be presented as evidence for the theory. Instructional implications will be identified.instruction across grades 3-12.
3
Dr. Anne Cunningham
The Pivotal Importance of Phonemic Awareness Integrated with Phonics
(Grade Level: Primary)
The science of reading has demonstrated the pivotal role of phonemic awareness in a structured literacy program for K-3 reading development.  The NELP Report (2009) specified that Alphabet Knowledge and Phonological Awareness are the two most important skills to be mastered by early learners in order for them to become fluent readers. In this presentation, we will discuss why phonemic awareness is so important to early learners, what the phonemic awareness skills are, outline specific strategies for integrating phonemic awareness with phonics instruction and detail the corresponding modifications in instructional materials that are important. Publications include Book Smart: How to Develop and Support Successful Motivated Readers, co-authored with Jamie Zibulsky, published by Oxford University Press.  Edited volumes include Developing Early Literacy: Report of the National Early Literacy Panel (NELP).
2:00 – 3:30
Dr. Elsa Cardenas-Hagan
Structured Literacy Among English Learners: What every educator should know based on large scale research for 25 years (Grade Level: All)
Structured Literacy is a term that describes a comprehensive and evidence-based approach for literacy instruction.  It includes foundational skills of reading and writing in addition to the development of oral language and comprehension in an explicit and systematic manner.  Large-scale research studies have been conducted among English learners for close to 25 years.  Every educator must understand the research and its implications for effective practices in the classroom. This session will describe the research and evidence-based practices necessary for the successful development of literacy among English learners.  A demonstration of effective literacy instruction for English learners that builds upon first language and literacy knowledge for the development of second language literacy will be modeled and practiced.  Participants will learn how to address cross-linguistic features into every lesson and thus implement an asset-based approach to instruction.
3:30 – 3:45
Closing Comments